Oval-8 Finger Splints – The Best Are Even Better!

Oval-8 Finger Splints for arthritis

It’s no secret that Oval-8 Finger Splints treat a variety of finger problems including arthritis, trigger finger and trigger thumb, mallet finger, swan neck deformity, hypermobility and crooked and broken fingers.

In addition to these conditions, Oval-8 finger splints can also be used to treat the symptoms of other problems associated with arthritis, stroke, Cerebral Palsy and more. These lightweight easy-to-wear finger splints are based on a orthopedic principle that it takes three points of pressure to stabilize or support a joint.

Now the best got even better! We are excited to announce improvements to the Oval-8 that make it easier on your eyes and even more comfortable on your fingers!

Oval-8 finger splint for arthritis

Plus + Marks the Spot

The new + sign on the end of the Oval-8 Splint marks the end that will fit looser (1/2 size larger) when put on the finger first

 

 

 

oval-8 finger splint for arthritis

 

No More Eye Strain

The Oval-8 name and size on the bottom of the band are easier to read

 

 

Oval-8 finger splint for arthritis

 

More Comfort

The smoother, seamless bands feel even better on your fingers

 

 

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Oval-8 Finger Splints for eds
Oval-8® Finger Splints

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our blogs are educational in nature and are not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic treatments. We are always happy to answer questions about products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.

Why the 3pp Elbow POP Splint Is Different from Other Elbow Braces?

3pp elbow pop splint for tennis or golfers elbow

A therapist’s explanation of why the 3pp Elbow POP Splint is different from other elbow braces!

As a therapist specializing in treating upper extremity conditions, I often treated patients with Tennis Elbow (lateral epicondylitis) and Golfer’s Elbow (medial epicondylitis) and tendinosis. While these conditions often could be traced to playing tennis or golf, the symptoms were more commonly related to “weekend warrior” activities such as painting, digging in the garden or aggressive “spring cleaning”. Whatever the cause, the symptoms of pain in the upper forearm when lifting or turning the arm were the same.

The standard treatment for Tennis or Golfer’s Elbow and tendinosis includes an initial period of rest and icing to reduce inflammation, followed by massage and gentle progressive stretching and strengthening exercises. Some patients were issued a wrist splint to hold the wrist at rest in an extended (bent backwards) position and many patients were issued a “tennis elbow strap”.

At the time, most elbow straps were designed to apply pressure around the forearm to act as a counter force. The goal was to reduce tension on the tendons and muscles at the elbow and rotate the forearm and extend the wrist.

After treating many patients with elbow straps designed to reduce inflammation and promote healing, applying what is essentially a tourniquet to the forearm didn’t seem to make much sense. A better solution would be to increase blood flow and oxygen for healing, not cut it off. When the time came to create an elbow strap for 3-Point Products, from my experiences as a therapist, I sought to deliver a design that applied the force– only where it is needed. I wanted the pressure to be over the tendons and muscles, without creating a tourniquet affect.   The design of the 3pp Elbow POP Splint achieved that goal!

The 3pp Elbow POP Splint provides compression only where it is needed without constricting circulation. The adjustable design allows you to determine how much pressure is needed to relieve your elbow pain. The soft, foam-lined non-slip material means you never have to over tighten to keep it in place – so you will never cut off circulation. Thin or thick pads can be added to adjust the amount of compression needed for pain-free elbow motion. This eliminates the hazard of restricting circulation or causing nerve compression symptoms that are common in persons with thin forearms or those with less muscle to distribute force.

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3pp Elbow Brace for tennis or golfers elbow
3pp Elbow POP Splint

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How to Relieve Tennis or Golfer’s Elbow with a 3pp Elbow POP Splint

Our blogs are educational in nature and are not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic treatments. We are always happy to answer questions about products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.

What is Trigger Finger and What Causes It?

trigger finger

What Is Trigger Finger?
If you wake up with your finger stuck in a bent position, feel a pop when you try to straighten it or have to use your other hand to open your finger, you may have Trigger Finger.

What Causes It?
Trigger finger or trigger thumb happens when the tendons in your finger or thumb become inflamed. Tendons are bands of tissue that connect muscles and bones. The tendons that bend your fingers travel through your palm and into your fingers. They move through a covering called a “sheath” and pass through a series of pulleys that hold your tendons close to your finger.

If your tendons are inflamed and there is swelling around them, they can get stuck in the sheath or as they goes through the pulley. When this happens, bending the finger pulls the inflamed tendon through a narrowed sheath, making it snap or pop.

Looking for more information on how to treat your trigger finger? Download our Oval-8 ebook

How do you get a Trigger Finger?
Trigger finger can happen in response to “overuse” activities that require repeated gripping or pinching. People whose work or other activities require gripping tools (such a dentist or hygienist) or other repetitive tasks for long periods of time can cause trigger fingers. Health conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes can also cause Trigger Finger. It’s also not uncommon for trigger fingers to occur without a known cause.

Resting your finger is the first step in treating your trigger finger.  The Oval-8 Finger Splint can help limit your finger motion, giving your trigger finger a chance to rest and heal. Oval-8 splints can be worn during the day and at night.

oval-8 finger splint for trigger finger

 

 

 

 

If your symptoms continue, your healthcare provider may also prescribe anti-inflammatories or a steroid injection. If your trigger finger still does not improve, surgery may be recommended.

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oval-8 finger splints for trigger finger
Oval-8® Finger Splints

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our blogs are educational in nature and are not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic treatments. We are always happy to answer questions about products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.

Oval-8 Splints or Silver Ring Splints– Which One is Right for Me?

differences between oval-8 finger splints and silve ring splints

Over the years we have been asked – “What is the difference between Oval-8 finger splints and Silver Ring splints”?  While there are many similarities between the two splints, there are many differences, as well.  Knowing the differences in these two splints can help you choose the best solution for your finger problem and help answer the question are Oval-8 Splints or Silver Ring Splints right for me?

Oval-8 Finger Splints are made of molded plastic and apply three points of control to support, correct or protect the finger joint. The ready-made splint is designed to treat multiple finger injuries and conditions including arthritis, mallet finger, hyperextension deformity, trigger finger, boutonniere deformity, crooked fingers or fractures, all with the same splint.

Oval-8 finger splint
Oval-8 Finger Splint

 

 

 

 

 

Silver Ring Splints are made of sterling silver and have a double-loop design with elliptically-shaped rings that fit comfortably on the finger. The multiple styles of silver ring splints have each been designed to address a different finger problem- such as the “swan neck splint”, the “boutonniere splint” and the “realignment splint”.   There are also splints that have been designed for some thumb problems.

Silver ring splint
Silver Ring Splint

 

 

 

 

 

While both splints are easy to wear, easy to clean and improve joint stability and finger function- knowing the differences can help you decide which one is right for you.

 

Here are a few differences:     

Oval-8 Finger Splint                                                                   Silver Ring Splint

Ready-made with 28 sizes to fit a broad range of finger sizes Custom made according to specific measurements
Neutral color makes them nearly invisible on many hands Sterling silver or gold give the appearance of quality jewelry
Prices range from $7.20 to $11.50 per splint depending on how many you purchase Silver Ring Swan Neck Splints start at $83. Prices vary for other designs
Ready-made splints are available online or from your health care provider. Do-It-Yourself sizing guide available online Available through health care providers (usually an Occupational Therapist or Hand Therapist) trained in sizing and fitting Silver Ring Splints
Each Oval-8 has size adjustability built into the bottom of the band to accommodate changes in swelling, temperature or time of day  Silver Ring splints are adjustable by gently bending the rings to customize the angle and fit of the splint
Oval-8 splints are designed to treat 6 or more different finger problems with just one splint Each Silver Ring Splints is custom designed to manage different finger and thumb problems
Oval-8 Splints can be adjusted with heat to accommodate for unusual finger sizes or conditions, but may not fit well if deformities are severe Silver Ring Splints can be custom designed and made to accommodate nearly any finger

Silver Ring Splints are made of sterling silver and are an attractive solution for your finger conditions. When you need an elegant, solution for a difficult finger problem, there is no substitute for a Silver Ring Splint. As the price point is a bit more expensive, they may be a perfect solution for evenings out and for situations where the appearance of your hands is a concern.

Oval-8 splints are very affordable and are a great way to find out if a finger splint will be effective in protecting or correcting your finger problem. They are easily replaceable and are great for everyday use and for those who may need multiple sizes for different fingers or for those who need to change sizes due to swelling.

For some acute conditions such as Mallet Finger, where the splint will only be worn for 4-6 weeks, the Oval-8 Splint may be the obvious choice. For fingers affected by arthritis or conditions such as Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS), where long term wear is expected, the choice between the two styles may be a personal preference.

Both an Oval-8 Finger Splint and a Silver Ring Splint can be great solutions to help treat your finger conditions.  You can use your Oval-8 when doing messy activates such as gardening, cooking or painting a wall, and save your Silver Ring Splint to wear when you are dressed up for work or  a night out on the town! The choice really is yours to make. Either way, both of these finger splints are an effective way to relieve pain and improve function.

For more information, on Silver Ring Splints please go to :   http://www.silverringsplint.com/

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Download Our eBook to learn how to treat your finger condition with an Oval-8 Finger Splint

oval 8 finger splints ebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Oval-8 Finger Splints
Oval-8® Finger Splints

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our blogs are educational in nature and are not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic treatments. We are always happy to answer questions about products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.

Buddy Taping or 3pp Toe Loops- Which Works Better for your Hurt Toe?

buddy taping broken toe

Are you limping because you stubbed, jammed, dropped something heavy, or broke your toe?  One of the most effective treatments for a hurt toe is buddy taping. So if you’ve injured your toe, it’s likely that your healthcare provider sent you to your local drugstore to get adhesive tape, gauze or bandages to tape your toes together. Continue reading “Buddy Taping or 3pp Toe Loops- Which Works Better for your Hurt Toe?”

My Wrist and Elbow Hurt – Common Golf Injuries

3pp Elbow Wraps

With summer in full swing, if you are a golfer– you are probably hitting the fairways. And although golf is considered to be a low impact sport, chances are as the season progresses you could experience an injury or aches and pains that could keep you off the course. Due to overuse or poor technique the potential for golf injuries can be high. If your wrist and elbow hurt – common golf injuries could be the reason.

Common golf injuries related to the wrist and elbow include:

  • Wrist Tendinitis
  • Wrist Ligament Injuries
  • Golfer’s Elbow and Tennis Elbow

Check out our video “Treating Golfer’s Elbow with the 3pp Elbow POP Splint” View Video

Wrist Tendinitis

Tendon inflammation is the most common wrist/hand complaint among golfers. Typically occurring in your leading hand, wrist tendons can become overly fatigued and inflamed- causing pain and tenderness which can affect your ability to hold your club correctly. Symptoms can include pain, tenderness and stiffness in your wrist; tingling sensation or numbness and muscle weakness.

Rest, along with anti-inflammatory medication such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen can help your pain and swelling.  Wrist splints that support but do not fully limit your motion can also help. The 3pp Wrist Wrap and the 3pp Wrist Pop Splint have light adjustable compression to support your wrist and the non slip foam lining makes them comfortable to wear while playing golf.  For more severe tendinitis, wrist splints with firmer control are usually recommended such as the Mueller Green Fitted Wrist Brace.

 Wrist Ligament Injuries

The repeated movement of your wrist during short puts or the hyperextension of your wrist during your golf swing can cause tears on the ligaments in your wrist. Specifically to your Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex ligaments, known as the TFCC ligament.

Symptoms can include pain and swelling at the base of the pinky side of the wrist; pain when you bend your wrist; clicking or grinding when you turn your wrist and loss of strength when you try to grip an object.

Applying ice and taking anti-inflammatory medication such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen can help with the pain and swelling. Resting your hand and wrist in a wrap or splint is important for healing and can help prevent further injury.  The 3pp Carpal Lift provides support without restricting your wrist or forearm motion. TFCC ligament injuries can be prevented by pre-golf stretching and wrist rotation exercises.

Golfer’s Elbow and Tennis Elbow- What’s the difference

Golfer’s Elbow describes the pain around the bony bump on the inside of your elbow. The pain can extend all the way to your wrist. It can be caused by repeated swinging of the club or locking your arm rather than keeping it straight and relaxed.

Symptoms include stiffness in your elbow, especially when you swing your club, make a fist, or try to grab something; pain all the way down your arm to the wrist and weak hands, especially when you shake hands.

Tennis Elbow describes a similar pain as Golfer’s Elbow but the pain occurs on the outside of your elbow near the bony bump and is tender to the touch.

Healing Golfer’s Elbow or Tennis Elbow can be a lengthy process. Applying ice, taking anti-inflammatory medication and using splints or wraps to relieve stress, reduce pain and allow the tendons to heal can all help. Wraps like the 3pp Elbow POP Splint can relieve pain and swelling without causing nerve problems. The 3pp Elbow Pop Splint won’t slip or roll, making it easy and comfortable to wear while playing golf.

To help prevent future golfing-related injuries, take time to stretch your arms, elbows and wrists before you play.  Warming up with some easy practice swings before you begin a round of golf or start hitting at the driving range can also help.  Stretching and strengthening the key muscles can help to increase your flexibility and endurance and ultimately help improve your game.

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3pp Elbow wrap for golfers or tennis elbow
Elbow Braces
3pp wrist braces for wrist problems
Wrist Braces

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Watch Our Video

How to Relieve Tennis or Golfer’s Elbow with a 3pp Elbow POP Splint

Our blogs are educational in nature and are not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic treatments. We are always happy to answer questions about products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.

EDS Hypermobility – Managing the Pain

EDS Hypermobility

EDS Hypermobility – Managing the Pain

People who believe their fingers, arms or other parts of their body are “double jointed” may not realize they could have a condition known as Ehler Danlos Syndrome (EDS).  EDS Hypermobility is a connective tissue disorder in which various parts of the body move beyond what is considered to be normal.

EDS is thought to be a genetic collagen abnormality where the surrounding tendons and ligaments are “overly elastic”, allowing the joints to move in an exaggerated position. While EDS is known to affect the neck, shoulders, back, hips and knees, many experience symptoms in their smaller joints as well, such as the hands, thumbs, wrists and elbows.  These abnormally flexible or “loose joints” are prone to an increased risk of injury and dislocation which can cause chronic discomfort and pain.

Check out our video “Treating Swan Neck Hyperextension with an Oval-8 Splint”- View Video

Managing the pain of EDS Hypermobility can be challenging. Unfortunately, relieving discomfort through medication is limited, as the underlying problem is caused from joint looseness and not from inflammation.  Many have found that an effective and important tool for the pain management of EDS is through splinting and bracing.

Splints and braces work to support a joint in a neutral position, while still allowing daily activities without pain. Supporting joints with a splint or brace allows freedom of movement, but within a normal range – which helps to reduce ligament and tendon sprains and dislocations.

There are a variety of splints that a health care professional or occupational therapist may recommend to provide differing levels of stability and protection. Neoprene wraps, braces and light thermoplastic splints may all help to provide support and pain relief. Custom made splints may also be helpful, as adjustments can be made to them based on individual needs.

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Oval-8 Finger Splints
EDS Splints & Braces
Our blogs are educational in nature and are not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic treatments. We are always happy to answer questions about products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.

Arthritis – Tips For Taking Good Care of Your Hands

Taking good care of your hands

Next time you wrap your fingers around a coffee mug, pick up a grocery bag, or scoop up some water to wash your face, thank your wonderful hands. Since we use our hands for nearly everything, we often take these anatomical blessings for granted.

Unless, of course, you have arthritis or an injury– then your hands may be painful, swollen, and stiff, especially in the morning. They may ache and simple things like picking up a key, holding a jar, and chopping food may be difficult.

While arthritis and other health concerns can be challenging, there are ways to reduce the stress to your hands and protect them. Follow these tips for helpful ways for taking good care of your hands.

Check out our video “Protexgloves- Easy to Wear, Comfortable Hand Protection ” View Video

1.  Strengthening and range of motion exercises

  • Simple daily hand exercises can help reduce pain and swelling while improving your muscle strength, flexibility, and range of motion in the joints. If you experience any pain, soak your hands in warm water while performing the exercises.

2. Modify your activities  You can’t avoid using your hands entirely; but, you can listen to your body and change the way you go about certain activities to diminish the strain on your hands.

  • Re-think painful activities. If chopping onions and vegetables hurts your hands, use fresh and frozen pre-cut options. Is it hard to open a jar? Use easy-open containers.
  • Use two hands to lift or grab an object. Pick up a gallon of milk with both hands rather than using one around the handle.
  • Use your whole hand rather than just your thumbs. Don’t lift heavy plates or bowls by grabbing them with your thumbs; carry them across both palms.
  • Rest and stretch. Stop to take a break and stretch during tasks that stress your hands, like vacuuming or washing dishes.

3. Use items that can help take the stress off your hands Adaptive (also called assistive) devices can help reduce pain and stress on your hands.  Some helpful items include:

  • In the kitchen -a knife with a curved blade that rocks as you cut, reduces the stress on your hands. The Duo Glide Knife has earned the Arthritis Foundation Ease-of-Use commendation.
  • When traveling- carry a light weight backpack style bag you can load up without straining your hands and arms while carrying your lunch and cameras. The Flip & Tumble Backpack folds into a tube and opens to a full size, lightweight pack.
  • Out in the garden– good gloves that fit comfortably and help you grip and pull are a must. Easy-to-wear, lightweight gloves such as Protexgloves are a great gardening option.

4. Wearing splints, braces or gloves  Wearing splints or braces that support your fingers/thumbs or gloves that help with swelling can allow for better movement and help relieve pain. It is always recommended that you consult with your healthcare provider on what will work best for you.

  • Finger splints can be worn to hold your fingers in a functional position. The Oval-8 Finger Splint is thin and light weight, and can be worn day or night without limiting hand movement.
  • Thumb splints can help support your thumbs and limit motion to help relieve pain. Lightweight less resistive splints can be a good starting solution. Often, all you need is a light support that provides compression around the joint(s) to support the thumb, while still allowing you to function. For light support, the 3pp ThumSling supports the CMC joint and applies light compression to help reduce slipping and grinding on the joint.
  • Protective gloves not only provide protection, but can help keep your hands from swelling for better function and movement. Protexgloves with light compression are soft and comfortable and can help make every day activities easier.

5. Talk to your health care provider

  • Your health care provider knows your health history and may recommend over-the-counter medications or joint relief products tailored to your needs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve), are commonly used to help with inflammation. Analgesics, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and aspirin or topical pain creams(Topricin) can also help reduce pain.
  • They may also recommend a visit with a physical or occupational therapist who specializes in treating conditions of the hand. Therapists can evaluate your needs and help you with exercises and techniques to relieve pain and make performing daily activities easier and more satisfying.
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Oval-8 Finger Splints
Oval-8® Finger Splints
3pp Thumsling
3pp® ThumSling®
protective compression gloves oh my arthritis
Protective Gloves
Topricin Pain Relief Cream
Topricin Pain Relief Cream

 

Our blogs are educational in nature and are not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic treatments. We are always happy to answer questions about products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.

How Long Do I Need To Wear My Thumb Brace?

CMCcare thumb brace for thumb arthritis pain

Does this sound familiar….   You have thumb arthritis, you hurt your thumb or are recovering from surgery. Your doctor recommended a thumb brace to keep you from moving it.  You’ve followed your doctor’s orders and worn your brace every day for an entire week and your thumb still hurts! You’re probably asking yourself — how long do I need to wear my thumb brace?

Don’t kid yourself. Pain doesn’t go away overnight. So, how long until you’re actually pain-free? The answer is…it depends.  Arthritis or an injury to a muscle, ligament or bone causes pain, swelling and discomfort. You need to heal and that means you need time…and patience.

Looking for more information on how to treat your thumb problem?  Download our ebook

Thumb braces are a simple, cost-effective way to reduce pain, provide support, improve movement and ease the stress on your joints. Wearing a brace can help eliminate your pain, but keep in mind you might need to wear it long-term or with other treatments such as medication, topical lotions and therapy. If you have arthritis, you may need to wear it for life –  when your pain flares up, during activities or at night.

Most health care providers will tell you to keep your brace on for a few days to several weeks, depending on the location and the severity of your thumb problem. As healing begins and you start to feel better, you may begin working to regain normal range of motion, and strength while still wearing your brace during the day and at night.  Over time as healing progresses and pain subsides, you will be able to wean out of wearing the splint and eventually discard it all together. The goal is for you to return to full use of your hand and thumb.

Given how important your thumbs are to everything you do, the “no pain, no gain” way of thinking is only liable to delay your recovery and cause you more discomfort. A key ingredient for your thumb to feel better is wearing a brace that will protect it and help you get back to full function. Just give it time and chances are you will be texting and using your thumb at full speed and strength once again.

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CMCcare thumb brace for thumb arthritis
          Thumb Braces
MyPain Away Fibro Cream for Fibromyalgia
MyPainAway FIBRO Cream

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our blogs are educational in nature and are not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Because your condition is unique to you, it is recommended that you consult with your health care provider before attempting any medical or therapeutic treatments. We are always happy to answer questions about products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.